Teton County adopts Wildlife Crossing Master Plan!

The Teton County Commission yesterday unanimously adopted its Wildlife Crossings Master Plan, which prioritizes sites where wildlife crossings could improve safety for both drivers and wildlife.

 A bull moose crosses the highway in Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyoming. Teton County just adopted a plan that will eventually make local roads safer for both drivers and wildlife. (Photo courtesy Josh Metten.)

A bull moose crosses the highway in Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyoming. Teton County just adopted a plan that will eventually make local roads safer for both drivers and wildlife. (Photo courtesy Josh Metten.)

We've worked alongside our agency and non-profit partners to see this plan through from concept to implementation, and today we celebrate this accomplishment. Wildlife Program Coordinator Chris Colligan is a member of the advisory committee that helped develop recommendations and finalize this plan. Chris has been working for the past 10 years in western Wyoming advocating for wildlife overpasses and underpasses that make roads safer for our families and for our cherished wildlife. 

The plan adoption is just the beginning. Teton County has allocated $150,000 in its fiscal year 2019 budget for preliminary planning, engineering, and design. And we're ready to support the county, as we supported another project that's happening right now: The Wyoming Department of Transportation is currently installing six wildlife underpasses south of Jackson. GYC is committed to making our roads safer for wildlife and families alike. We'll continue to be involved in making this plan a reality, to bring down the number of drivers that hit deer, elk, and other wildlife.

Thank you to the Teton County Commission and to our local agency and NGO partners who made this plan a reality.

And thank you! The adoption of this plan would not have been possible without your comments and support.  

-- Mac Dukart, Teton Outreach Associate