custer gallatin national forest

Newspaper Opinion: Our Last, Best Chance to Protect the Gallatins

Newspaper Opinion: Our Last, Best Chance to Protect the Gallatins

June 6 is a date looming large for those who prize the Gallatin Range. It’s the last day the public can submit comments on how the U.S. Forest Service should manage the Custer Gallatin National Forest, including the Gallatins, for the next 20 to 30 years.

No surprise then that emotions among those with a vested interest in the Gallatins have been running high over the last several weeks. Nothing less than the fate of our beloved backyard mountains – and their wildlife, waters, and recreational opportunities – is at stake.

Chronicle column: Gallatin Forest Partnership: A path forward for our wild backyard

Chronicle column: Gallatin Forest Partnership: A path forward for our wild backyard

You have the chance to help determine the future of our wild backyard for the next 30 years.

We are lucky to call the Gallatin and Madison mountains home. They provide abundant wildlife, clean drinking water, and wild trails – but for how much longer? Between skyrocketing populations and a changing landscape, these constants of mountain living are starting to look a lot less certain. Now the Custer Gallatin National Forest’s management plan is up for its once-in-a-generation revision, giving us our chance to secure our mountains’ future.

Public lands in public hands: the Gallatin Forest Partnership

Public lands in public hands: the Gallatin Forest Partnership

As a community organizer, I spend a lot of time thinking about how and why people come together. In today’s age of polarizing politics, common ground is admittedly hard to come by. Fortunately for us in Montana, we’ve got plenty of it – over 30 million acres, in fact. Our abundant public land is the literal common ground upon which all manner of Montanans stand to celebrate, enjoy, and defend.

(Photo Eliza Wiley.)

Looking ahead to 2019 in Greater Yellowstone

Looking ahead to 2019 in Greater Yellowstone

While we had a very successful 2018, we’re looking even more forward to the endeavors of 2019. We’ll be wrapping up a few campaigns, diving deeper into some big projects, and keeping an eye out for new issues in the ecosystem that needs our attention. We asked our staff what they’re most excited for in the New Year and this is what they had to say.

(Photo Louise Johns.)

GYC, Forest Service cap $1 million, five-year project to keep bears alive and people safe

 GYC, Forest Service cap $1 million, five-year project to keep bears alive and people safe

Millions of visitors who camp and picnic in National Forests in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem can sleep a bit more soundly this summer, knowing that Forest Service campgrounds are being bearproofed - updated with bear-safe bear boxes that keep bears wild and people safe.

GYC seeks stronger protection for 645 miles of Montana rivers

GYC seeks stronger protection for 645 miles of Montana rivers

We’re recommending that 645 miles of streams and rivers in southwest Montana be protected from dams and other industrial development by the Forest Service. Imagine walking from the Space Needle in Seattle to the GYC office in Bozeman – eight hours a day for a month – and you’ll be imagining the 645 river miles we’re asking Montana’s Custer Gallatin National Forest to keep as they are.

You can help protect Bozeman’s wild backyard!

You can help protect Bozeman’s wild backyard!

On any weekend in Hyalite, the Bridger Mountain Range or the Lee Metcalf Wilderness you will see lots of other people playing on skis, bikes, snowmobiles or on foot. Our experience is important and we want to protect it. This can be difficult with so many people doing so many things in the forest but it's not impossible. When we stand up for our shared values the Forest Service will listen. The Custer Gallatin National Forest is organizing public workshops in your area starting in February an on through early April. They are interested in learning what you do, where you go and what you care about in the forest.