Let's Build Wildlife Crossings so Jackson Hole Moose can Cross the Highway

Let's Build Wildlife Crossings so Jackson Hole Moose can Cross the Highway

We’ve all seen too many dead animals on the side of the road. Just this past week our community witnessed two young moose that were hit and killed at the intersection of Wyoming highways 22 and 390.

In Teton County it is estimated that over 500 animals a year are killed on our roads. A history of development within wildlife habitat has left land cross-sectioned with roads, creating a danger for our wildlife and for ourselves and our families. In Wyoming, 1 in 5 collisions involve wildlife, 1 in 50 collisions with injuries involve wildlife, and 1 in 100 fatal collisions involve wildlife. These are real dangers for the safety of our highways, but the good news is they are largely preventable.

Photo Jackson Hole EcoTours

"Beers and Bears" brings a crowd in Idaho!

"Beers and Bears" brings a crowd in Idaho!

As grizzly bears disperse across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem during the summer, it’s important to host bear safety refreshers throughout the ecosystem. The Greater Yellowstone Coalition’s Idaho field office teamed up with Idaho Fish and Game, Mountain Bike the Tetons, and Teton Valley Trails and Pathways to bring the mechanical bear “Charger” back to Teton Valley. 

Newspaper Opinion: Our Last, Best Chance to Protect the Gallatins

Newspaper Opinion: Our Last, Best Chance to Protect the Gallatins

June 6 is a date looming large for those who prize the Gallatin Range. It’s the last day the public can submit comments on how the U.S. Forest Service should manage the Custer Gallatin National Forest, including the Gallatins, for the next 20 to 30 years.

No surprise then that emotions among those with a vested interest in the Gallatins have been running high over the last several weeks. Nothing less than the fate of our beloved backyard mountains – and their wildlife, waters, and recreational opportunities – is at stake.

2019 Montana Legislative Session: How the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem fared

2019 Montana Legislative Session: How the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem fared

The 66th Montana legislative session is over. We worked with many others in the conservation community to stop a variety of harmful wildlife bills and ensure a few positive bills made it to the finish line. My colleague Shana Drimal and I frequently traveled to Helena and worked with a full-time lobbyist to protect the wildlife of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Thanks for calling your legislators and making your voice heard for the wildlife of Greater Yellowstone.

VICTORY! Montana court denies mining company permit to explore for gold near Yellowstone

VICTORY! Montana court denies mining company permit to explore for gold near Yellowstone

Yesterday, a Montana district court ruled in our favor and denied a permit that would have allowed Canadian mining company Lucky Minerals to explore for gold in Emigrant Gulch just north of Yellowstone National Park. Along with the passage of the Yellowstone Gateway Protection Act that permanently protects public lands, this stunning victory further drives a stake through the heart of the proposed gold mining threatening the Yellowstone River and Paradise Valley.

Snoring Moose and Building Safe Roads

Snoring Moose and Building Safe Roads

As the tranquilized moose snored away, GYC Wildlife Program Coordinator Chris Colligan supported her massive head and monitored her breathing while she was fitted with a new GPS-tracking collar. A former Wyoming Game and Fish (WGFD) employee, Chris is no stranger to working with wild animals. What is relatively new to Chris is all the progress being made to incorporate wildlife crossings on roads around the state of Wyoming and beyond. 

Ruby Valley Stories: Ruby Dell Ranch

Ruby Valley Stories: Ruby Dell Ranch

The Greater Yellowstone Coalition is committed to visiting with the ranchers of the Ruby Valley to hear their stories, focusing on their livestock and carnivore encounters. While we know that grizzlies are expanding and ranchers are in their path, we don’t know what’s happening on the ground. Montana Conservation Coordinator Darcie Warden and I are leading the charge to lend an ear and learn about what ranchers and their employees need to live and thrive on the landscape with grizzly bears.