wildlife crossings

Statewide Support for Wildlife Conservation License Plates

Statewide Support for Wildlife Conservation License Plates

As we all know, Wyoming is a rural state connected by extensive roads that we all travel to conduct business, recreate, and stay connected with friends and family. And if you drive these roads regularly, there is a good chance that you may hit an animal one day - and likely know someone who already has. 

Kudos to Yellowstone for Sharing its Priorities

Kudos to Yellowstone for Sharing its Priorities

It’s hard to get too excited about strategic planning, but as a road map toward future goals a plan is a critical piece of work, especially when it’s for a place as important and beloved as Yellowstone National Park. Earlier this month, the park released its five strategic priorities that will guide its short- and long-term decision making. We applaud Superintendent Cam Sholly for sharing the park’s priorities so widely and transparently.

Let's Build Wildlife Crossings so Jackson Hole Moose can Cross the Highway

Let's Build Wildlife Crossings so Jackson Hole Moose can Cross the Highway

We’ve all seen too many dead animals on the side of the road. Just this past week our community witnessed two young moose that were hit and killed at the intersection of Wyoming highways 22 and 390.

In Teton County it is estimated that over 500 animals a year are killed on our roads. A history of development within wildlife habitat has left land cross-sectioned with roads, creating a danger for our wildlife and for ourselves and our families. In Wyoming, 1 in 5 collisions involve wildlife, 1 in 50 collisions with injuries involve wildlife, and 1 in 100 fatal collisions involve wildlife. These are real dangers for the safety of our highways, but the good news is they are largely preventable.

Photo Jackson Hole EcoTours

Snoring Moose and Building Safe Roads

Snoring Moose and Building Safe Roads

As the tranquilized moose snored away, GYC Wildlife Program Coordinator Chris Colligan supported her massive head and monitored her breathing while she was fitted with a new GPS-tracking collar. A former Wyoming Game and Fish (WGFD) employee, Chris is no stranger to working with wild animals. What is relatively new to Chris is all the progress being made to incorporate wildlife crossings on roads around the state of Wyoming and beyond. 

GYC supports wildlife crossings on Targhee Pass

GYC supports wildlife crossings on Targhee Pass

Every fall, two of Yellowstone’s nine main elk herds move from their summer range in Yellowstone National Park to their winter range outside of the Park. Both herds need to cross U.S. Highway 20 - one of the busiest thoroughfares to Yellowstone - through Island Park, Idaho, to get there.

Wyoming migrations break long-distance records

Wyoming migrations break long-distance records

A stunning transformation is beginning to sweep over the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE).  For months, our great herds of elk, deer, pronghorn, moose, bison, and bighorn sheep have taken shelter in valleys, retreating from the snow covered mountains.  Now, the melting snow exposes hints of green grasses as the region begins to awaken from winters slumber. This is what the herds have been waiting for.